Ethnic variations in overweight and obesity among children over time: findings from analyses of the Health Surveys for England 1998-2009


Karlsen, S; Morris, S; Kinra, S; Vallejo-Torres, L; Viner, RM; (2013) Ethnic variations in overweight and obesity among children over time: findings from analyses of the Health Surveys for England 1998-2009. Pediatric obesity, 9 (3). pp. 186-196. ISSN 2047-6302 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2047-6310.2013.00159.x

[img] Text - Published Version
License:

Download (235kB)

Abstract

BackgroundThe increase in the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents in England since the mid-1990s has been dramatic. Cross-sectional evidence suggests ethnic variations in childhood obesity prevalence. ObjectivesThe objective of the study was to examine whether and how ethnic variations in childhood overweight/obesity have changed over time, and are affected by socioeconomic factors. MethodThis study uses logistic regression to analyse ethnic differences in the relative likelihood of being at or above the age- and gender-specific thresholds for overweight and obesity developed by the International Obesity Task Force among children aged between 2 and 15 from 11 ethnic groups included in the Health Surveys for England between 1998 and 2009, adjusting for age, gender, year of data collection and equivalized household income. We separately analyse the likelihood of being at or above the thresholds for overweight (but below those for obesity) and obesity. ResultsTrends in overweight/obesity over time among ethnic minority groups do not follow those of white English children. Black African children had higher rates of overweight and obesity, which appear to have peaked, and black Caribbean children had higher rates of obesity than other groups examined, which appear to continue rising. These differences were not explained by socioeconomic variations between groups. ConclusionPolicies are required that encourage healthy lifestyles among ethnic minority young people, while engaging with the complexities associated with these choices during childhood and adolescence.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 23554401
Web of Science ID: 336253300007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1805413

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
174Downloads
245Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item