Using directed acyclic graphs to consider adjustment for socioeconomic status in occupational cancer studies


Richiardi, L; Barone-Adesi, F; Merletti, F; Pearce, N; (2008) Using directed acyclic graphs to consider adjustment for socioeconomic status in occupational cancer studies. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 62 (7). ISSN 0143-005X DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.2007.065581

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

There is an ongoing debate on whether analyses of occupational studies should be adjusted for socioeconomic status (SES). In this paper directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) were used to evaluate common scenarios in occupational cancer studies with the aim of clarifying this issue. It was assumed that the occupational exposure of interest is associated with SES and different scenarios were evaluated in which ( a) SES is not a cause of the cancer under study, (b) SES is not a cause of the cancer under study, but is associated with other occupational factors that are causes of the cancer, (c) SES causes the cancer under study and is associated with other causal occupational factors. These examples illustrate that a unique answer to the issue of adjustment for SES in occupational cancer studies is not possible, as in some circumstances the adjustment introduces bias, in some it is appropriate and in others both the adjusted and the crude estimates are biased. These examples also illustrate the benefits of using DAGs in discussions of whether or not to adjust for SES and other potential confounders.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Bias (Epidemiology), Confounding Factors (Epidemiology), Data Interpretation, Statistical, Epidemiologic Methods, Epidemiologic Studies, Humans, Neoplasms, epidemiology, Occupational Diseases, epidemiology, Occupational Exposure, statistics & numerical data, Risk Factors, Social Class
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 18572430
Web of Science ID: 256807600020
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1785

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
317Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item