Using marketing theory to inform strategies for recruitment: a recruitment optimisation model and the txt2stop experience.


Galli, L; Knight, R; Robertson, S; Hoile, E; Oladapo, O; Francis, D; Free, C; (2014) Using marketing theory to inform strategies for recruitment: a recruitment optimisation model and the txt2stop experience. Trials, 15 (1). p. 182. ISSN 1745-6215 DOI: 10.1186/1745-6215-15-182

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Recruitment is a major challenge for many trials; just over half reach their targets and almost a third resort to grant extensions. The economic and societal implications of this shortcoming are significant. Yet, we have a limited understanding of the processes that increase the probability that recruitment targets will be achieved. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to bring analytical rigour to the task of improving recruitment, thereby increasing the likelihood that trials reach their recruitment targets. This paper presents a conceptual framework that can be used to improve recruitment to clinical trials. METHODS Using a case-study approach, we reviewed the range of initiatives that had been undertaken to improve recruitment in the txt2stop trial using qualitative (semi-structured interviews with the principal investigator) and quantitative (recruitment) data analysis. Later, the txt2stop recruitment practices were compared to a previous model of marketing a trial and to key constructs in social marketing theory. RESULTS Post hoc, we developed a recruitment optimisation model to serve as a conceptual framework to improve recruitment to clinical trials. A core premise of the model is that improving recruitment needs to be an iterative, learning process. The model describes three essential activities: i) recruitment phase monitoring, ii) marketing research, and iii) the evaluation of current performance. We describe the initiatives undertaken by the txt2stop trial and the results achieved, as an example of the use of the model. CONCLUSIONS Further research should explore the impact of adopting the recruitment optimisation model when applied to other trials.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 24886627
Web of Science ID: 338453700001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1782993

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