When is it cost-effective to change the behavior of health professionals?


Mason, J; Freemantle, N; Nazareth, I; Eccles, M; Haines, A; Drummond, M; (2001) When is it cost-effective to change the behavior of health professionals? JAMA, 286 (23). pp. 2988-2992. ISSN 0098-7484 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.286.23.2988

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Abstract

Because of the workings of health care systems, new, important, and cost-effective treatments sometimes do not become routine care while well-marketed products of equivocal value achieve widespread adoption. Should policymakers attempt to influence clinical behavior and correct for these inefficiencies? Implementation methods achieve a certain level of behavioral change but cost money to enact. These factors can be combined with the cost-effectiveness of treatments to estimate an overall policy cost-effectiveness. In general, policy cost- effectiveness is always less attractive than treatment cost- effectiveness. Consequently trying to improve the uptake of underused cost-effective care or reduce the overuse of new and expensive treatments may not always make economic sense. in this article, we present a method for calculating policy cost- effectiveness and illustrate it with examples from a recent trial, conducted during 1997 and 1998, of educational outreach by community pharmacists to influence physician prescribing in England.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Converting-enzyme-inhibitors, primary-care, development, project, heart-failure, guideline, north, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Drug Costs, Drug Utilization, economics, Education, Medical, Continuing, England, Fees, Pharmaceutical, Health Care Costs, Human, Patient Care Management, standards, Physician's Practice Patterns, economics, trends, Policy Making, Practice Guidelines, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 11743840
Web of Science ID: 172764500031
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/17498

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