The magnitude and cost of global blindness: An increasing problem that can be alleviated


Frick, KD; Foster, A; (2003) The magnitude and cost of global blindness: An increasing problem that can be alleviated. American journal of ophthalmology, 135 (4). pp. 471-476. ISSN 0002-9394 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0002-9394(02)02110-4

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To identify the potential effect on global economic productivity of successful interventions, that are planned as part of the "VISION 2020-right to sight" initiative. The initiative aims to eliminate avoid. able blindness. DESIGN: This study used economic and epidemiologic modeling. METHODS: Existing data and assumptions about blindness prevalence, national populations, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, labor force participation, and unemployment rates were used to project the economic productivity loss associated with unaccommodated blindness. RESULTS: Without extra interventions, the global number of blind individuals would increase from 44 million in the year 2000 to 76 million in 2020. A successful VISION 2020 initiative would result in only 24 million blind in 2020 and lead to 429 million blind person years avoided. A conservative estimate of the economic gain is $102 billion. CONCLUSIONS: The VISION 2020 initiative has the potential to increase global economic productivity. (C) 2003 by Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Blindness, economics, epidemiology, Child, Child, Preschool, Cost of Illness, Developed Countries, Developing Countries, Economics, Health Care Costs, Human, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Middle Age, Models, Biological, Models, Economic, Prevalence, World Health
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: The International Centre for Evidence in Disability
International Centre for Eye Health
PubMed ID: 12654362
Web of Science ID: 181642600007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/17371

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