Examining catastrophic costs and benefit incidence of subsidized antiretroviral treatment (ART) programme in south-east Nigeria


Onwujekwe, O; Dike, N; Chukwuka, C; Uzochukwu, B; Onyedum, C; Onoka, C; Ichoku, H; (2008) Examining catastrophic costs and benefit incidence of subsidized antiretroviral treatment (ART) programme in south-east Nigeria. Health policy (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 90 (2-3). pp. 223-9. ISSN 0168-8510 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2008.10.006

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Abstract

: To examine the extent to which costs of subsidized antiretrovirals treatment (ART) programmes are catastrophic and the benefit incidence that accrues to different population groups.<br/> : Data on expenditures to patients for receiving treatment from a government subsidized ART clinic was collected using a questionnaire. The patient costs excluded time and other indirect costs. Catastrophic cost was determined as the percentage of total expenditure on ART treatment as a proportion of household non-food expenditures on essential items.<br/> : On average, patients spent 990 Naira (US$ 8.3) on antiretroviral (ARV) drugs per month. They also spent an average of $8.2 on other drugs per month. However, people that bought ARV drugs from elsewhere other than the ART clinic spent an average of $88.8 per month. Patients spent an average of $95.1 on laboratory tests per month. Subsidized ARV drugs depleted 9.8% of total household expenditure, other drugs (e.g. for opportunistic infections) depleted 9.7%, ARV drugs from elsewhere depleted 105%, investigations depleted 112.9% and total expenditure depleted 243.2%. The level of catastrophe was generally more with females, rural dwellers and most poor patients. Females and urbanites had more benefit incidence than males and rural dwellers.<br/> : Subsidized ART programme lowers the cost of ARV drugs but other major costs are still incurred, which make the overall cost of accessing and consuming ART treatment to be excessive and catastrophic. The costs of laboratory tests and other drugs should be subsidized and there should also be targeting of ART programme to ensure that more rural dwellers and the most-poor people have increased benefit incidence.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Ambulatory Care Facilities/economics, Anti-Retroviral Agents/*economics, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Drug Costs, Female, *Financing, Government, Government Programs/*economics, Health Care Costs/*statistics & numerical data, Humans, Incidence, Male, Nigeria, Questionnaires, *Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors, Ambulatory Care Facilities, economics, Anti-Retroviral Agents, economics, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Drug Costs, Female, Financing, Government, Government Programs, economics, Health Care Costs, statistics & numerical data, Humans, Incidence, Male, Nigeria, Questionnaires, Social Class, Socioeconomic Factors
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
PubMed ID: 19036466
Web of Science ID: 265998000014
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1696207

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