Management of uncomplicated malaria in children under 13 years of age at a district hospital in Senegal: from official guidelines to usual practices.


Sarrassat, S; Lalou, R; Cissé, M; Le Hesran, JY; (2011) Management of uncomplicated malaria in children under 13 years of age at a district hospital in Senegal: from official guidelines to usual practices. Malar J, 10. p. 285. ISSN 1475-2875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-10-285

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: To be effective, national malaria guidelines must be properly followed. This study evaluated nurses' practices in the management of uncomplicated malaria cases at a District Hospital. Its objective was to identify the reasons for discrepancies between official guidelines and usual practices. METHODS: This study took place at Oussouye hospital, south-western Senegal. Blood smears were available for biological diagnosis in patients aged more than five years while the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness recommended treating fevers presumptively in children under five. First line anti-malarial was Amodiaquine plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ+SP) bi-therapy. Hospital records of children under 13 years of age seen between 2004 and 2005 were reviewed. RESULTS: Among children treated with anti-malarials, 74% (2, 063/2, 789) received AQ+SP. However, only 22% (406/1, 879) of febrile children and 19% (429/2, 198) of children diagnosed with malaria got a blood smear. Moreover, an anti-malarial was prescribed for 80% (377/474) of children with a negative blood smear. CONCLUSIONS: The transition from chloroquine to AQ+SP was well followed. Nonetheless, blood smear use was very low and many over-prescriptions were reported. Reasons for discrepancies between guidelines and practices can be classified in three main categories: ambiguous guidelines, health system's dysfunctions and nurses' own considerations. Aside from the strengthening of the public health system, in order to guarantee practices complying with guidelines, training content should be more adapted to nurses' own considerations.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 21958422
Web of Science ID: 296711500001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/167067

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