Sociodemographic context of the AIDS epidemic in a rural area in Tanzania with a focus on people's mobility and marriage


Boerma, JT; Urassa, M; Nnko, S; Ng'Weshemi, J; Isingo, R; Zaba, B; Mwaluko, G; (2002) Sociodemographic context of the AIDS epidemic in a rural area in Tanzania with a focus on people's mobility and marriage. Sexually transmitted infections, 78 Suppl 1. i97-105. ISSN 1368-4973 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/sti.78.suppl_1.i97

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Abstract

This analysis focuses on how sociocultural and economic characteristics of a poor semi-urban and rural population (Kisesa ward) in north west Tanzania may directly and indirectly affect the epidemiology of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Poverty and sociocultural changes may contribute to the observed high levels of marital instability and high levels of short and long term migration in Kisesa, especially among younger adults. Marriage and migration patterns are important underlying factors affecting the spread of HIV. The most cost-effective intervention strategy may be to focus on the trading centre in which mobility is higher, bars were more common, and HIV prevalence and incidence were considerably higher than in the nearby rural villages. If resources suffice, additional work can be undertaken in the rural villages, although it is not clear to what extent the rural epidemic would be self sustaining if the interventions in the trading centre were effective.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Sexually-transmitted diseases, hiv-1 infection, antenatal, clinics, core-group, population, spread, prevalence, workers, africa, std, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, epidemiology, prevention & control, transmission, Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Developing Countries, statistics & numerical data, Emigration and Immigration, Female, Human, Male, Marriage, Middle Age, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Behavior, Sex Distribution, Socioeconomic Factors, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S., Tanzania, epidemiology, Travel
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Population Studies (1974-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Population Studies Group
PubMed ID: 12083453
Web of Science ID: 175878000013
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/16607

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