Factors affecting immunogenicity of BCG in infants, a study in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK.


Hur, YG; Gorak-Stolinska, P; Lalor, MK; Mvula, H; Floyd, S; Raynes, J; Ben-Smith, A; Fitchett, JR; Flanagan, KL; Burl, S; Ota, MO; Crampin, AC; Smith, SG; Dockrell, HM; (2014) Factors affecting immunogenicity of BCG in infants, a study in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK. BMC Infect Dis, 14 (1). p. 184. ISSN 1471-2334 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-14-184

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Abstract

BACKGROUND BCG immunogenicity in infants differs between populations and these differences have been attributed to various factors. In this study, the influence of geographical location, season of birth, timing of vaccination, micronutrient status (zinc) and inflammatory status (C-reactive protein, CRP) were assessed. METHODS Immunogenicity was assessed by cytokine signature in culture supernatants from diluted whole blood samples stimulated with M. tuberculosis PPD, using a multiplex bead assay. Results were correlated with the plasma zinc and CRP concentrations at the time of sampling, and with interview and household data. BCG vaccinated infants were recruited in Malawi, The Gambia and the UK. RESULTS In Malawi, infants vaccinated within the first week after birth showed lower production of most cytokines measured than those vaccinated later. The number of cytokines showing significant differences between Malawian and Gambian infants decreased after adjusting for season of birth. In Malawi, a proportion of infants had zinc deficiency and elevated plasma CRP (>10 mg/L), but neither zinc deficiency nor high CRP was associated with production of any of the cytokines measured. CONCLUSIONS The cytokine/chemokine signatures observed in response to M. tuberculosis PPD in infants at 3 months post BCG vaccination were affected by geographical location, season of birth, and timing of vaccination but not associated with the concentration of plasma zinc or inflammatory status. These factors should be considered in future trials of new TB vaccines.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Academic Services & Administration > Academic Administration
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
TB Centre
MEIRU
Population Studies Group
Tropical Epidemiology Group
The International Centre for Evidence in Disability
PubMed ID: 24708690
Web of Science ID: 335472000001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1649014

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