Malaria vectors in the municipality of Serra do Navio, State of Amapa, Amazon region, Brazil


Povoa, MM; Wirtz, RA; Lacerda, RNL; Miles, MA; Warhurst, D; (2001) Malaria vectors in the municipality of Serra do Navio, State of Amapa, Amazon region, Brazil. Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 96 (2). pp. 179-84. ISSN 0074-0276

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

We conducted a survey to determine the vectors of malaria in six localities of Serra do Navio municipality, State of Amapá, from 1990 to 1991. Malaria infection rates of 29.3%, 6.2% and 20.4% were detected by human blood smears in Colônia Agua Branca, Porto Terezinha and Arrependido, respectively. There was no malaria infection detected in Serra do Navio. Fifteen species were identified among 3,053 anopheline mosquitoes collected by human bait and 64.4% were identified as Anopheles albitarsis s.l., 16.7% An. braziliensis, 9.5% An. nuneztovari and 5.8% An. triannulatus. An. darlingi, the main vector of malaria in the Amazon region of Brazil, was scare. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a total positive rate of 0.8% (23/2876) was found for six species: fifteen An. albitarsis s.l., four An. nuneztovari, and one of each: An. braziliensis, An. triannulatus, An. oswaldoi and An. rangeli. Nine of 23 positive mosquitoes were infected with Plasmodium malariae, eight with P. vivax VK210, three with P. vivax VK247 and three with P. falciparum. Since An. albitarsis s.l. was collected feeding on humans, was present in the highest density and was positive by ELISA for malaria sporozoites, it probably plays an important role in malaria transmission in this area.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: mosquito, Anopheles, malaria vector, Plasmodium, Brazil, Anopheles, transmission, culicidae, rondonia, diptera, Animal, Anopheles, parasitology, Brazil, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Human, Insect Vectors, parasitology, Malaria, transmission, Plasmodium, isolation & purification, Seasons, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 11285494
Web of Science ID: 166996300008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/16243

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
340Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item