Socioeconomic Position and Health-Seeking Behavior for Hearing Loss Among Older Adults in England.


Benova, L; Grundy, E; Ploubidis, GB; (2014) Socioeconomic Position and Health-Seeking Behavior for Hearing Loss Among Older Adults in England. The journals of gerontology Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, 70 (3). pp. 443-52. ISSN 1079-5014 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbu024

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with progression in the health-seeking process for hearing loss.<br/> METHOD: Logistic regression of data from a cross-sectional survey representative of noninstitutionalized, 50 years and older population of England (ELSA wave 2, 2004). Using self-reported hearing difficulty as starting point, we examined the association between SEP and health-seeking behaviors in 6 stages leading to hearing aid acquisition and use.<br/> RESULTS: Higher SEP was associated with lower odds of self-reported hearing difficulty, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83-0.91, p < .001). There was marginal negative association between higher SEP and receiving hearing aid recommendation (adjusted OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99, p = .05). SEP was not associated with any other stage of health-seeking behavior.<br/> DISCUSSION: Among the noninstitutionalized older population of England, SEP-related inequalities exist in the prevalence of self-reported hearing loss. However, SEP is not strongly associated with progression in the remaining stages of health-seeking process during and after an individual's contact with the health system.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Population Studies (1974-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Maternal Health Group
PubMed ID: 24663332
Web of Science ID: 356598500012
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1620764

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