What happens to Palestine refugees with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare centre in Jordan who fail to attend a quarterly clinic appointment?


Khader, A; Ballout, G; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Farajallah, L; Zeidan, W; Abu-Zayed, I; Kochi, A; Harries, AD; Zachariah, R; Kapur, A; Shaikh, I; Seita, A; (2014) What happens to Palestine refugees with diabetes mellitus in a primary healthcare centre in Jordan who fail to attend a quarterly clinic appointment? Tropical medicine & international health, 19 (3). pp. 308-312. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12256

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Abstract

Objective In a primary healthcare clinic in Jordan to determine: (i) treatment outcomes stratified by baseline characteristics of all patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) ever registered as of June 2012 and (ii) in those who failed to attend the clinic in the quarter (April-June 2012), the number who repeatedly did not attend in subsequent quarters up to 1year later, again stratified by baseline characteristics. Method A retrospective cohort study with treatment outcome data collected and analysed using e-health and the cohort analysis approach in UNRWA Nuzha Primary Health Care Clinic for Palestine refugees, Amman, Jordan. Results As of June 2012, there were 2974 patients with DM ever registered, of whom 2246 (76%) attended the clinic, 279 (9%) did not attend, 81 (3%) died, 67 (2%) were transferred out and 301 (10%) were lost to follow-up. A higher proportion of males and patients with undetermined or poor disease control failed to attend the clinic compared with those who attended the clinic. Of the 279 patients who did not attend the clinic in quarter 2, 2012, 144 (52%) were never seen for four consecutive quarters and were therefore defined as lost to follow-up. There were a few differences between patients who were lost to follow-up and those who re-attended at another visit that included some variation in age and fewer disease-related complications amongst those who were lost to follow-up. Conclusion This study endorses the value of e-health and cohort analysis for monitoring and managing patients with DM. Just over half of patients who fail to attend a scheduled quarterly appointment are declared lost to follow-up 1year later, and systems need to be set up to identify and contact such patients so that those who are late for their appointments can be brought back to care and those who might have died or silently transferred out can be correctly recorded.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 24387037
Web of Science ID: 330740000008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1620464

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