Visual function in breast-fed term infants weaned to formula with or without long-chain polyunsaturates at 4 to 6 months: a randomized clinical trial


Hoffman, DR; Birch, EE; Castaneda, YS; Fawcett, SL; Wheaton, DH; Birch, DG; Uauy, R; (2003) Visual function in breast-fed term infants weaned to formula with or without long-chain polyunsaturates at 4 to 6 months: a randomized clinical trial. The Journal of pediatrics, 142 (6). pp. 669-77. ISSN 0022-3476 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2003.213

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Breast-fed infants receive docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in their diet. Upon weaning, infants lose this dietary source of long-chain polyunsaturates because many commercial formulas do not contain these important constituents for neural membrane biogenesis. We evaluated the benefits of postweaning dietary supplementation of DHA + ARA on visual maturation. STUDY DESIGN: Healthy term infants (n = 61) were breast-fed to 4 to 6 months, then were randomly assigned to commercial formula or formula supplemented with DHA (0.36%) + ARA (0.72%). Measurements of red blood cell (RBC) fatty acids, visually evoked potential (VEP) acuity, and stereoacuity were done before and after weaning. RESULTS: At 1 year of age, RBC-DHA in the commercial formula-fed group was reduced by 50% from the weaning level, whereas there was a 24% increase in the DHA + ARA-supplemented group. The primary outcome measure, VEP acuity, was significantly more mature in supplemented infants at 1 year of age. Elevated RBC-DHA levels were associated with more mature VEP acuity. There were no significant diet-related differences in stereoacuity. CONCLUSIONS: These data extend through the first year of life the critical period in which a dietary supply of DHA and ARA can contribute in optimizing visual development in term infants.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 12838196
Web of Science ID: 183657300016
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/16164

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
283Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item