Associations between Intimate Partner Violence and Health among Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.


Buller, AM; Devries, KM; Howard, LM; Bacchus, LJ; (2014) Associations between Intimate Partner Violence and Health among Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS medicine, 11 (3). e1001609. ISSN 1549-1277 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001609

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Intimate partner violence (IPV) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is a significant problem. Little is known about the association between IPV and health for MSM. We aimed to estimate the association between experience and perpetration of IPV, and various health conditions and sexual risk behaviours among MSM. METHODS AND FINDINGS We searched 13 electronic databases up to 23 October 2013 to identify research studies reporting the odds of health conditions or sexual risk behaviours for MSM experiencing or perpetrating IPV. Nineteen studies with 13,797 participants were included in the review. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to estimate pooled odds ratios (ORs). Exposure to IPV as a victim was associated with increased odds of substance use (OR = 1.88, 95% CIOR 1.59-2.22, I2 = 46.9%, 95% CII2 0%-78%), being HIV positive (OR = 1.46, 95% CIOR 1.26-1.69, I2 = 0.0%, 95% CII2 0%-62%), reporting depressive symptoms (OR = 1.52, 95% CIOR 1.24-1.86, I2 = 9.9%, 95% CII2 0%-91%), and engagement in unprotected anal sex (OR = 1.72, 95% CIOR 1.44-2.05, I2 = 0.0%, 95% CII2 0%-68%). Perpetration of IPV was associated with increased odds of substance use (OR = 1.99, 95% CIOR 1.33-2.99, I2 = 73.1%). These results should be interpreted with caution because of methodological weaknesses such as the lack of validated tools to measure IPV in this population and the diversity of recall periods and key outcomes in the identified studies. CONCLUSIONS MSM who are victims of IPV are more likely to engage in substance use, suffer from depressive symptoms, be HIV positive, and engage in unprotected anal sex. MSM who perpetrate IPV are more likely to engage in substance use. Our results highlight the need for research into effective interventions to prevent IPV in MSM, as well as the importance of providing health care professionals with training in how to address issues of IPV among MSM and the need to raise awareness of local and national support services. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Research Centre: Gender Violence and Health Centre
Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (SaME)
PubMed ID: 24594975
Web of Science ID: 333408000009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1603944

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