The predicted impact of private sector MMR vaccination on the burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome


Vynnycky, E; Gay, NJ; Cutts, FT; (2003) The predicted impact of private sector MMR vaccination on the burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Vaccine, 21 (21-22). pp. 2708-2719. ISSN 0264-410X DOI: 10.1016/S0264-410X(03)00229-9

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Abstract

In many developing countries, Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine is available through the private but not the public sectors, and there is no systematic rubella vaccination among adult women. In this paper, we extend previous modeling studies to demonstrate that in developing countries with a medium-high force of infection (200-400/1000 per year), current levels of private sector MMR coverage (<60%) would lead to increases in the incidence of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) both among unvaccinated individuals and the general population even when mixing between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals is fairly minimal. Our findings highlight the need for countries to establish surveillance of trends in susceptibility to rubella and CRS incidence and perhaps introduce rubella vaccination among women of child-bearing age. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: *Congenital Rubella Syndrome/cn [Congenital Disorder], *Congenital Rubella Syndrome/dt [Drug Therapy], *Congenital Rubella Syndrome/ep [Epidemiology], *Congenital Rubella Syndrome/pc [Prevention], *Vaccination, Developing Country, Incidence, Health Statistics, Health Survey, Infection Rate, Infection Sensitivity, Disease Transmission, Population Research, Infection Prevention, Human, Female, Major Clinical Study, Controlled Study, Article, Priority Journal, *Measles Mumps Rubella Vaccine/dt [Drug Therapy], *Rubella Vaccine/dt [Drug Therapy]
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Vaccine Centre
PubMed ID: 12798608
Web of Science ID: 183709300005
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/15890

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