Parental smoking and childhood cancer: results from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study


Pang, D; McNally, R; Birch, JM; On Behalf Of The Uk Childhood Cancer Study Group (, Including; Peto, J; ), ; (2003) Parental smoking and childhood cancer: results from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study. British journal of cancer, 88 (3). pp. 373-81. ISSN 0007-0920 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6600774

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (114kB) | Preview

Abstract

There are strong a priori reasons for considering parental smoking behaviour as a risk factor for childhood cancer but case - control studies have found relative risks of mostly only just above one. To investigate this further, self-reported smoking habits in parents of 3838 children with cancer and 7629 control children included in the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study (UKCCS) were analysed. Separate analyses were performed for four major groups (leukaemia, lymphoma, central nervous system tumours and other solid tumours) and more detailed diagnostic subgroups by logistic regression. In the four major groups, after adjustment for parental age and deprivation there were nonsignificant trends of increasing risk with number of cigarettes smoked for paternal preconception smoking and nonsignificant trends of decreasing risk for maternal preconception smoking (all P-values for trend >0.05). Among the diagnostic subgroups, a statistically significant increased risk of developing hepatoblastoma was found in children whose mothers smoked preconceptionally (OR=2.68, P=0.02) and strongest (relative to neither parent smoking) for both parents smoking (OR=4.74, P=0.003). This could be a chance result arising from multiple subgroup analysis. Statistically significant negative trends were found for maternal smoking during pregnancy for all diagnoses together (P<0.001) and for most individual groups, but there was evidence of under-reporting of smoking by case mothers. In conclusion, the UKCCS does not provide significant evidence that parental smoking is a risk factor for any of the major groups of childhood cancers.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Great Britain, Hepatoblastoma/epidemiology/*etiology, Human, Infant, Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology, Male, Maternal Exposure, Paternal Exposure, Pregnancy, *Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Smoking/*adverse effects, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Adolescent, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Great Britain, Hepatoblastoma, epidemiology, etiology, Human, Infant, Liver Neoplasms, epidemiology, etiology, Male, Maternal Exposure, Paternal Exposure, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Smoking, adverse effects, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 12569379
Web of Science ID: 181432900007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/15435

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
232Downloads
326Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item