Heterogeneity of breast cancer risk within the South Asian female population in England: a population-based case-control study of first-generation migrants


McCormack, VA; Mangtani, P; Bhakta, D; McMichael, AJ; Dos Santos Silva, I; (2004) Heterogeneity of breast cancer risk within the South Asian female population in England: a population-based case-control study of first-generation migrants. British journal of cancer, 90 (1). pp. 160-6. ISSN 0007-0920 DOI: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6601440

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Abstract

South Asian women in England have a lower breast cancer risk than their English-native counterparts, but less is known about variations in risk between distinct South Asian ethnic subgroups. We used the data from a population-based case-control study of first-generation South Asian migrants to assess risks by ethnic subgroup. In all, 240 breast cancer cases, identified through cancer registries, were individually matched on age and general practitioner to two controls. Information on the region of origin, religious and linguistic background, and on breast cancer risk factors was obtained from participants. Breast cancer odds varied significantly between the ethnic subgroups (P=0.008), with risk increasing in the following order: Bangladeshi Muslims (odds ratio (OR) 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.10, 1.06), Punjabi Hindu (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.33, 1.27), Gujarati Hindu (1=reference group), Punjabi Sikh (OR 1.23, 95% CI: 0.72, 2.11) and Pakistani/Indian Muslims (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.81). The statistically significant raised risk in Pakistani/Indian Muslims increased with adjustment for socioeconomic and reproductive risk factors (OR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.25, 3.58), but was attenuated, and no longer significant, with further adjustment for waist circumference and intake of nonstarch polysaccharides and fat (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 0.85, 2.63). These findings reveal differences in breast cancer risk between South Asian ethnic subgroups, which were not fully explained by reproductive differences, but were partly accounted for by diet and body size.British Journal of Cancer (2004) 90, 160-166. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6601440 www.bjcancer.com

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Cancer Survival Group
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 14710224
Web of Science ID: 188096500028
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/15132

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