Efficacy of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine alone or combined with amodiaquine or chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ugandan children


Talisuna, AO; Nalunkuma-Kazibwe, A; Bakyaita, N; Langi, P; Mutabingwa, TK; Watkins, WW; van Marck, E; D'Alessandro, U; Egwang, TG; (2004) Efficacy of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine alone or combined with amodiaquine or chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ugandan children. Tropical medicine & international health, 9 (2). pp. 222-229. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-3156.2003.01187.x

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Abstract

The rapid development of falciparum resistance to sulphadoxine- pyrimethamine (SP) in East and Central Africa has raised concerns as to the efficacy of combining it with another drug. In 2002, we assessed the efficacy of SP alone and combined with amodiaquine (AQ/SP) or chloroquine (CQ/SP) in Ugandan children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. At day 14, adequate clinical response was 100% (84/84) for AQ/SP, 93% (92/101) for CQ/SP and 91% (73/80) for SP. At day 28, parasitological failure (RI-RIII) occurred in 16% (13/80) of children treated with AQ/SP, in 48% (48/100) of those treated with CQ/SP and in 61% (48/79) of those treated with SP alone. Compared with the AQ/SP arm, the odds for parasitological failure at day 28 were five times higher (95% CI, 2-10) in the CQ/SP group and sevenfold higher (95% CI, 3-17) in that of SP alone. CQ/SP does not offer any significant added benefit over SP alone while AQ/SP is an efficacious low-cost combination. These findings have important policy implications for Uganda and other resource-constrained African countries faced with the problematic choice of a new first-line antimalarial treatment in a context of high CQ resistance.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: in vivo efficacy, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, chloroquine, amodiaquine, combination therapy, falciparum malaria, Uganda, Antimalarial-drug-resistance, plasmodium-falciparum, randomized, trial, artesunate, combination, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, mutation, kampala, pfcrt
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 15040559
Web of Science ID: 188720600006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/14898

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