Valuing the benefits of a health intervention using three different approaches to contingent valuation: re-treatment of mosquito bed-nets in Nigeria


Onwujekwe, O; Fox-Rushby, J; Hanson, K; (2004) Valuing the benefits of a health intervention using three different approaches to contingent valuation: re-treatment of mosquito bed-nets in Nigeria. Journal of health services research & policy, 9 (2). pp. 67-75. ISSN 1355-8196 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1258/135581904322987472

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the level of willingness to pay (WTP) for re-treatment of mosquito nets and to compare the theoretical validity of WTP estimates from three contingent valuation question formats: the bidding game, binary with follow-up technique, and a novel structured haggling technique that mimicked price-taking behaviour in the study area. METHODS: WTP was elicited from randomly selected respondents from three villages in Southeast Nigeria, using pretested interviewer-administered questionnaires. Respondents' WTP for insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) was first elicited before their WTP for re-treatment of ITNs. Ordinary least-squares regression was used to assess theoretical validity. RESULTS: More than 95% of the respondents were willing to pay for re-treatment. The mean WTP was 37.1 Naira, 43.4 Naira and 49.2 Naira in the bidding game, binary with follow-up and structured haggling groups, respectively (US dollar 1.00 = 120 Naira). The WTP estimates elicited across the three question formats were statistically different (P < 0.01). Ordinary least-squares estimation showed that WTP was positively related to many variables, especially stated WTP for ITNs (P < 0.05). Structured haggling generated the highest number of statistically significant variables to explain WTP. CONCLUSIONS: The three contingent valuation approaches generated different distributions of WTP for net retreatment, possibly due to their inherent differences. Structured haggling generated the most theoretically valid estimates of WTP. The levels of WTP identified suggest that user fees exceeding 50 Naira per net re-treatment may discourage demand for the service. This is an important challenge for ITN programmes.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 15099453
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/14779

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