Abortion as a backup method for contraceptive failure in China


Wang, D; Yan, H; Feng, Z; (2004) Abortion as a backup method for contraceptive failure in China. Journal of biosocial science, 36 (3). pp. 279-87. ISSN 0021-9320 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021932003006217

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Abstract

Contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are reported to be high in China, but little is known about the consequence of contraceptive failure and characteristics of women who decide to have an abortion if a contraceptive failure occurs. Using 6225 contraceptive failures from the 1988 Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey, this study examines the resolution of contraceptive failure and assesses the impact of some women's sociodemographic characteristics on the decision to terminate contraceptive failure in abortion. This study has three important findings: (1) The abortion rate was 50.1%, 75.3% and 80.2% for IUD, condom and pill failures, respectively; (2) The abortion rates differed by contraceptive method and women's social and demographic characteristics. In particular, a woman with just one child was most likely to have the contraceptive failure aborted; (3) Some women experienced repeated abortions because of contraceptive failure. The results suggest that abortion was a backup method if contraception failed in China and the correlates of aborting an unwanted pregnancy reflect the strong impact of the Chinese family planning programme.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 15164936
Web of Science ID: 221563400002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/14704

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