NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations.


Chapman, SJ; Khor, CC; Vannberg, FO; Rautanen, A; Segal, S; Moore, CE; Davies, RJ; Day, NP; Peshu, N; Crook, DW; Berkley, JA; Williams, TN; Scott, JA; Hill, AV; (2010) NFKBIZ polymorphisms and susceptibility to pneumococcal disease in European and African populations. Genes and immunity, 11 (4). pp. 319-25. ISSN 1466-4879 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/gene.2009.76

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Abstract

The proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has a central role in host defence against pneumococcal disease. Both rare mutations and common polymorphisms in the NFKBIA gene encoding the NF-kappaB inhibitor, IkappaB-alpha, associate with susceptibility to bacterial disease, but the possible role of polymorphisms within the related IkappaB-zeta gene NFKBIZ in the development of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) has not been reported previously. To investigate this further, we examined the frequencies of 22 single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning NFKBIZ in two case-control studies, comprising UK Caucasian (n=1008) and Kenyan (n=723) individuals. Nine polymorphisms within a single UK linkage disequilibrium (LD) block and all four polymorphisms within the equivalent, shorter Kenyan LD block displayed either a significant association with IPD or a trend towards association. For each polymorphism, heterozygosity was associated with protection from IPD when compared with the combined homozygous states (for example, for rs600718, Mantel-Haenszel 2 x 2 chi(2)=7.576, P=0.006, odds ratio (OR)=0.67, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for OR: 0.51-0.88; for rs616597, Mantel-Haenszel 2 x 2 chi(2)=8.715, P=0.003, OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.49-0.86). We conclude that multiple NFKBIZ polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to IPD in humans. The study of multiple populations may aid in fine mapping of associations within extensive regions of strong LD ('transethnic mapping').

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 19798075
Web of Science ID: 278291000004
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1440401

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