Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not decrease breast milk intake of Malawian infants.


Kumwenda, C; Dewey, KG; Hemsworth, J; Ashorn, P; Maleta, K; Haskell, MJ; (2013) Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not decrease breast milk intake of Malawian infants. The American journal of clinical nutrition. ISSN 0002-9165 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.076588

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The potential for small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to promote growth and development after 6 mo of age is currently being investigated. Because infants self-regulate energy intake, consumption of LNS may reduce breast milk intake and potentially decrease the beneficial effects of breast milk. OBJECTIVE The objective was to test the hypothesis that the breast milk intake of 9- to 10-mo-old rural Malawian infants receiving LNS would not be lower than that of infants receiving no supplementation. DESIGN This was a substudy of the International Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements (iLiNS) DOSE trial, in which 6-mo-old infants were randomly assigned to receive 10, 20, or 40 g LNS/d containing 56, 117, or 241 kcal/d, respectively, or no LNS until 18 mo of age. A subset was randomly selected to estimate breast milk intake at 9-10 mo of age with the dose-to-mother deuterium oxide dilution method. The noninferiority margin was <10% of total energy requirements. RESULTS Baseline characteristics (n = 376) were similar across groups. The mean (±SD) daily breast milk intake of unsupplemented infants was 730 ± 226 g. The differences (95% CIs) in mean intake of infants provided with 10, 20, or 40 g LNS/d, compared with controls, were +62 (-18, +143), +30 (-40, +99), and +2 (-68, +72) g/d, respectively. Non-breast milk oral water intake did not differ by group (P = 0.39) and was inversely (r = -0.22, P < 0.01) associated with breast milk intake. CONCLUSION In this rural Malawian population, breast milk intake at 9-10 mo of age was not reduced by supplementation with complementary foods with 10-40 g LNS/d. This study was a substudy within the iLiNS DOSE trial, which was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00945698.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 24368436
Web of Science ID: 332143900025
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1440248

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
271Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item