Emergency contraception use and non-use in young women: the application of a contextual and dynamic model.


Free, C; Ogden, J; (2005) Emergency contraception use and non-use in young women: the application of a contextual and dynamic model. British journal of health psychology, 10 (Pt 2). pp. 237-53. ISSN 1359-107X DOI: 10.1348/135910705X25985

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

There have been many approaches to understanding contraception use including social cognition models which have been criticised for their individualistic approach and their static nature. The present quantitative study developed and refined a contextual and dynamic model of contraception use that was derived using qualitative research. This model conceptualizes the predictors of contraception use in terms of the meaning and importance of a range of social goals, perceptions of vulnerability, and constraints on or facilitators of contraception use each of which changes over time. The present study operationalized this model in relation to emergency contraception and explored differences between users and non-users and between episodes of use and non-use. In terms of users and non-users, the results showed that the users of emergency contraception showed a more positive view of an emergency contraception user, perceived greater support from their partner for emergency contraception use, rated themselves more at risk of pregnancy, and felt more confident about asking for emergency contraception. In terms of use and non-use, use was related to an increased belief about the risk of pregnancy, increased partner support, increased concern about health care professionals and the side-effects of the drug, and a more positive identity of an emergency contraception. The study has helped to develop and refine the model and has identified some key factors that are specifically relevant to emergency contraception use in a sample of women in education in and around London.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 15969852
Web of Science ID: 229072200006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/13580

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
291Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item