Biting time of Anopheles darlingi in the Bolivian Amazon and implications for control of malaria.


Harris, AF; Matias-Arnez, A; Hill, N; (2005) Biting time of Anopheles darlingi in the Bolivian Amazon and implications for control of malaria. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 100 (1). pp. 45-7. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2005.07.001

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Abstract

Malaria is a growing problem in the Bolivian Amazon where there has been a four-fold increase between 1991 and 1998, largely owing to forest clearance bringing human and vector into closer association. The principle vector in this region is Anopheles darlingi Root, the behaviour of which has been little studied in this part of South America. The peak time of biting of A. darlingi was studied over a series of nights in July 2003 during the dry season in the town of Riberalta in the Bolivian Amazon. Peak biting occurred between 19:00 and 21:00 hours, when 48% of the total night's biting took place. This early biting habit has implications regarding control of malaria via the use of insecticide-treated bed nets. Anopheles darlingi was the most prevalent vector in the study, although A. albitarsis s.l. and A. braziliensis were also present.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 16154607
Web of Science ID: 233764200009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/13100

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