Infants with intrauterine growth restriction have impaired formation of docosahexaenoic acid in early neonatal life: a stable isotope study


Llanos, A; LI, Y; Mena, P; Salem, N; Uauy, R; (2005) Infants with intrauterine growth restriction have impaired formation of docosahexaenoic acid in early neonatal life: a stable isotope study. Pediatric research, 58 (4). pp. 735-740. ISSN 0031-3998 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1203/01.PDR.0000180542.68526.A2

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Abstract

This study evaluated the arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) formation from d5-labeled linoleic acid (d5-LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (d5-LNA) precursors in infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) compared with control groups matched by gestational age (GA) or birth weight. We compared DHA and AA formation from deuterated precursors d5-LA and d5-LNA in 11 infants with IUGR with 13 and 25 control subjects who were appropriate for GA and matched by GA and by birth weight, respectively. After an enteral administration of d5-LA and d5-LNA, we determined unlabeled and d5-labeled fatty acids at 24, 48, and 96 h in plasma. Absolute concentrations and area under the curve (AUC) over the 96-h study were used for analysis. Absolute concentration of d5-DHA and the product/precursor ratio of the d5-labeled AUCs indicated a less active DHA formation from LNA in infants with IUGR compared with their GA-matched (2-fold) and birth weight-matched (3-fold) control subjects. The ratios of eicosapentaenoic and n-3 docosapentaenoic acid to DHA were also affected. Similar evaluation for the n-6 series was not significant. DHA metabolism is affected in infants with IUGR; the restricted DPA to DHA conversion step seems to be principally responsible for this finding.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 16189202
Web of Science ID: 232172600020
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/12872

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