Vitamin a supplementation does not affect infants' immune responses to polio and tetanus vaccines.


Newton, S; Cousens, S; Owusu-Agyei, S; Filteau, S; Stanley, C; Linsell, L; Kirkwood, B; (2005) Vitamin a supplementation does not affect infants' immune responses to polio and tetanus vaccines. The Journal of nutrition, 135 (11). pp. 2669-73. ISSN 0022-3166

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

It has been suggested that administering vitamin A with the measles vaccine may reduce the vaccine's immunogenicity. This trial examined the effect of supplementing vitamin A during the early months of life on infants' immune responses to tetanus and polio vaccines. Young infants (n = 1085) were enrolled and individually randomized into 1 of 4 groups in a factorial, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Three vitamin A supplementation strategies were investigated: 1) supplementation of breast-feeding mothers with 60 mg retinol equivalent (RE) vitamin A within 4 wk of delivery; 2) Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)-linked supplementation of infants with 7.5 mg RE vitamin A at 6, 10, and 14 wk; and 3) combined mother and child supplementations. A 4th group in which mother and child were given placebos served as controls. Blood samples were collected from each child at 6 wk and 6 mo of age to measure antipolio antibody titer, antitetanus toxoid antibodies, and avidity of antibodies to tetanus. Of the infants randomized into the 4 arms of the study, 767 (71%) completed follow-up at 6 mo of age. Follow-up rates were similar in all 4 arms (69-72%, P = 0.8). Antibody titers were relatively high in all 4 groups at both 6 wk and 6 mo of age, with no differences among the groups. We found no evidence that vitamin A supplementation affects infants' antibody responses to tetanus toxoid or oral polio vaccine delivered at EPI contacts.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 16251628
Web of Science ID: 233260000030
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/12519

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
332Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item