Rapid assessment for prioritisation of trachoma control at community level in one district of the Kaolack Region, Senegal.


Faye, M; Kuper, H; Dineen, B; Bailey, R; (2005) Rapid assessment for prioritisation of trachoma control at community level in one district of the Kaolack Region, Senegal. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 100 (2). pp. 149-57. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2005.06.029

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to use a modified Lot Quality Assurance Sampling methodology to classify communities according to prevalence of active trachoma and to estimate the prevalence of trachoma and trichiasis in Nioro department, Kaolack Region, Senegal. A survey was conducted using two-stage cluster sampling to select 50 children aged 2-5 years in each of 33 clusters. In total 1,648 children were examined for active trachoma. Information on trachoma risk factors was collected through interviews with the mother or the household head of the child. Adults (>40 years) with trichiasis were identified through case finding. Nineteen clusters had a low prevalence of active trachoma in children aged 2-5 years (<20%), 11 had medium prevalence (20-40%) and three had high prevalence (>40%). The prevalence of active trachoma in children aged 2-5 years was 17.4% (95% CI 12.9-21.8%). Multivariate-adjusted predictors of active trachoma were: age, facial cleanliness, hygiene practices and keeping cattle in the household. The prevalence of trichiasis in adults aged over 40 years was 1.77% (95% CI 1.24-2.51), equating to 985 adults (95% CI 765-1250) with trichiasis in Nioro department. In conclusion, a survey using rapid methodology showed that trachoma is a problem of public significance in Nioro department, Senegal.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Neglected Tropical Diseases Network
The International Centre for Evidence in Disability
Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 16253300
Web of Science ID: 234627700009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/12500

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