Serum cholesterol, haemorrhagic stroke, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction: Korean national health system prospective cohort study.


Ebrahim, S; Sung, J; Song, YM; Ferrer, RL; Lawlor, DA; Smith, GD; (2006) Serum cholesterol, haemorrhagic stroke, ischaemic stroke, and myocardial infarction: Korean national health system prospective cohort study. BMJ (Clinical research ed), 333 (7557). p. 22. ISSN 0959-8138 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38855.610324.80

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate risk factors, such as heavy alcohol consumption, that might explain any increased risk of haemorrhagic stroke associated with low blood cholesterol. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Korea. PARTICIPANTS: 787,442 civil servants (661,700 men, 125,742 women) aged 30-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed at biennial health check. Data on morbidity and mortality were ascertained from 1990 to 2001 using hospital admissions and mortality surveillance systems. RESULTS: 6328 cases of ischaemic stroke (6021 men, 307 women), 3947 cases of haemorrhagic stroke (3748 men, 199 women), 3170 cases of undefined stroke (2902 men, 268 women), and 4417 cases of myocardial infarction (4305 men, 112 women) occurred. Ischaemic stroke and myocardial infarction were strongly and positively associated with blood cholesterol (hazard ratio per 1 mmol/l cholesterol 1.20 (95% confidence 1.16 to 1.24) and 1.48 (1.43 to 1.53), respectively). Haemorrhagic stroke showed an inverse association in fully adjusted models (0.91, 0.87 to 0.95). This inverse association was confined to participants with hypertension. When stratified by concentration of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), an indicator of alcohol consumption, the association was not seen in participants with low concentrations of GGT, and it was independent of hypertension in those with high concentrations of GGT (> 80 U/l).

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 16757495
Web of Science ID: 238922900022
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/11865

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