Multiple HIV-1 infections with evidence of recombination in heterosexual partnerships in a low risk Rural Clinical Cohort in Uganda


Ssemwanga, D; Lyagoba, F; Ndembi, N; Mayanja, BN; Larke, N; Wang, SY; Baalwa, J; Williamson, C; Grosskurth, H; Kaleebu, P; (2011) Multiple HIV-1 infections with evidence of recombination in heterosexual partnerships in a low risk Rural Clinical Cohort in Uganda. Virology, 411 (1). pp. 113-131. ISSN 0042-6822 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2010.12.025

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Abstract

We report on the frequency of multiple infections, generation of recombinants and consequences on disease progression in 35 HIV-1 infected individuals from 7 monogamous and 6 polygamous partnerships within a Rural Clinical Cohort in Uganda. The env-C2V3, gag-p24 and pol-IN genes were sequenced. Single genome amplified half genome sequences were used to map recombination breakpoints. Three participants were dually infected with subtypes A and D, one case with subtype A and A/D recombinant and the fifth with 2 phylogenetically distinct A/D recombinants. Occurrence of A/D recombination was observed in two multiple infected individuals. Rate of late stage WHO events using Cox regression was 3 times greater amongst multiple infected compared to singly infected individuals (hazard ratio 3.35; 95% CI 1.09, 10.3; p = 0.049). We have shown that polygamous relationships involving subtype discordant partnerships was a major contributor of multiple infections with generation of inter subtype recombinants in our cohort. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: HIV-1, Multiple infections, Superinfection, Coinfection, Recombination, IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS TYPE-1, INJECTION-DRUG USERS, DISEASE, PROGRESSION, DUAL INFECTION, SUBTYPE-B, MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY, LONG-TERM, IN-DEPTH, SUPERINFECTION, PATIENT
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 21239033
Web of Science ID: 287630200012
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1104

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