Age-related changes in hookworm infection, anaemia and iron deficiency in an area of high Necator americanus hookworm transmission in south-eastern Brazil.


Brooker, S; Jardim-Botelho, A; Quinnell, RJ; Geiger, SM; Caldas, IR; Fleming, F; Hotez, PJ; Correa-Oliveira, R; Rodrigues, LC; Bethony, JM; (2007) Age-related changes in hookworm infection, anaemia and iron deficiency in an area of high Necator americanus hookworm transmission in south-eastern Brazil. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 101 (2). pp. 146-54. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2006.05.012

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Abstract

Surprisingly few detailed age-stratified data exist on the epidemiology of hookworm and iron status, especially in Latin America. We present data from a cross-sectional survey examining 1332 individuals aged 0-86 years from a community in south-east Brazil for hookworm, anaemia and iron deficiency. Sixty-eight percent of individuals were infected with the human hookworm Necator americanus. The force of infection (lambda=0.354) was similar to estimates from other areas of high hookworm transmission. Individuals from poorer households had significantly higher prevalence and intensity of infection than individuals from better-off households. The prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anaemia was 11.8%, 12.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Anaemia was most prevalent among young children and the elderly. Univariate analysis showed that haemoglobin and serum ferritin were both significantly negatively associated with hookworm intensity among both school-aged children and adults. Multivariate analysis showed that, after controlling for socio-economic status, iron indicators were significantly associated with heavy hookworm infection. Our results indicate that, even in areas where there is a low overall prevalence of anaemia, hookworm can still have an important impact on host iron status, especially in school-aged children and the elderly.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Neglected Tropical Diseases Network
PubMed ID: 17027054
Web of Science ID: 243708200008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/10865

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