Effectiveness of a community intervention on malaria in rural Tanzania - a randomised controlled trial.


Eriksen, J; Mujinja, P; Warsame, M; Nsimba, S; Kouyaté, B; Gustafsson, LL; Jahn, A; Müller, O; Sauerborn, R; Tomson, G; (2010) Effectiveness of a community intervention on malaria in rural Tanzania - a randomised controlled trial. African health sciences, 10 (4). pp. 332-40. ISSN 1680-6905

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Malaria infections are a major public health problem in Africa and prompt treatment is one way of controlling the disease and saving lives.<br/> METHODS: This cluster-randomised controlled community intervention conducted in 2003-2005 aimed at improving early malaria case management in under five children. Health workers were trained to train community-based women groups in recognizing malaria symptoms, providing first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria and referring severe cases. Evaluation was through a pre- (2004) and a post-intervention survey (2005). Anaemia prevalence was the primary outcome.<br/> RESULTS: 1715 children aged 6-59 months were included in the pre-intervention survey and 2169 in the post-intervention survey. The prevalence of anaemia decreased significantly from 37% [95% CI 34.7-39.3] to 0.5% [95% CI 0.2-0.7] after the intervention (p<0.001); slightly more in the intervention (from 43.9% to 0.8%) than in the control (30.8% to 0.17%) group (p=0.038). Fever and reported fever decreased significantly and the mean body weight of the children increased significantly over the study period in both control and intervention groups.<br/> CONCLUSION: The decrease in anaemia was significantly associated with the intervention, whereas the fever and body weight trends might be explained by other malaria control activities or seasonal/climate effects in the area. The community intervention was shown to be feasible in the study context.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
PubMed ID: 21416034
Web of Science ID: 290219100006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1084

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