Fetal, Developmental, and Parental Influences on Cystatin C in Childhood: The Uppsala Family Study.


Nitsch, D; Sandling, JK; Byberg, L; Larsson, A; Tuvemo, T; Syvänen, AC; Koupil, I; Leon, DA; (2011) Fetal, Developmental, and Parental Influences on Cystatin C in Childhood: The Uppsala Family Study. American journal of kidney diseases. ISSN 0272-6386 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2010.12.025

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim was to identify determinants (biomedical and social characteristics of children and their parents) of cystatin C levels in healthy children drawn from a population sample. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 425 pairs of consecutive full siblings born 1987-1995 in Uppsala were identified using the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and invited with their parents for examination in 2000-2001. OUTCOME: Serum cystatin C level was log-transformed and analyzed using random-effects models. MEASUREMENTS: The examination in parents and children consisted of a nonfasting blood sample, anthropometry, and questionnaires about lifestyle and socioeconomic position. Tanner stage was used for assessment of pubertal status. RESULTS: In age-, height-, and body mass index-adjusted analyses, cystatin C level increased by 2.6% (95% CI, 0.3%-4.8%) higher in Tanner stage 2 vs 1 girls, and 1.6% (95%CI, 0.2%-3.1%) lower in boys than girls. For every 10% increase in maternal cystatin C level, offspring cystatin C level increased by 3.0% (95% CI, 2.2%-3.8%); the equivalent effect for paternal cystatin C level was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.9%). Lower maternal education was associated with a 2.4% (95% CI, 0.3%-4.6%) higher cystatin C level in their offspring. LIMITATIONS: Cross-sectional study design, missing cystatin C values for subset of parents, lack of urinary measurements, no gold-standard measurement of glomerular filtration rate. CONCLUSIONS: There are intergenerational associations of cystatin C level in families in line with previous reports of heritability of kidney disease. Lower maternal education is associated with higher cystatin C levels in their children. Further studies of healthy children are needed to explore the biological mechanisms for these findings. If cystatin C is measured, these studies will need to record pubertal stages.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: ECOHOST - The Centre for Health and Social Change
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 21420772
Web of Science ID: 290788400011
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1079

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