Gender differences in work-related risk factors associated with low back symptoms.


Widanarko, B; Legg, S; Stevenson, M; Devereux, J; Eng, A; 't Mannetje, A; Cheng, S; Pearce, N; (2012) Gender differences in work-related risk factors associated with low back symptoms. Ergonomics, 55 (3). pp. 327-42. ISSN 0014-0139 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2011.642410

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

: The prevalence of low back symptoms (LBS) in many working populations is high and differences in prevalence between genders are inconsistent. However, gender-specific risk factors for LBS have seldom been examined. Hence, the aim of the present study was to indicate gender-specific LBS risk factors. A sample of 3003 people was interviewed by telephone to get information about current workplace exposure and LBS. The risk of LBS for the whole population increased with work in awkward/tiring positions (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.12-1.68) and very/extremely stressful jobs (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.05-2.03). None of the explanatory variables were significantly associated with LBS for males but working in awkward/tiring positions (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.20), dissatisfaction with contact and cooperation with management (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.02-2.78) and finding their job to be very/extremely stressful (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.46-3.52) were significantly associated with LBS for females. Interventions to reduce LBS in workplaces should focus on reducing working in awkward/tiring positions, improving contact and cooperation with management, and reducing stressful jobs, especially amongst females. PRACTITIONER SUMMARY: Strategies to prevent or reduce LBS should focus on reducing exposure to awkward or tiring positions at work, improving contact and cooperation with management, and reducing stressful jobs, especially for females.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 22409170
Web of Science ID: 303583400006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/103761

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
283Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item