Effectiveness of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccines Administered According to Various Schedules: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Data.


Jackson, C; Mann, A; Mangtani, P; Fine, P; (2013) Effectiveness of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Vaccines Administered According to Various Schedules: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Data. The Pediatric infectious disease journal, 32 (11). pp. 1261-9. ISSN 0891-3668 DOI: 10.1097/INF.0b013e3182a14e57

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) are widely used. The full implications of Hib vaccination schedule for vaccine effectiveness (VE) are unclear.<br/> METHODS: We searched the literature for observational studies reporting the effectiveness of conjugate Hib vaccines administered according to different schedules. We summarized dose-specific VE estimates, where appropriate, using random effects meta-analysis.<br/> RESULTS: Thirty-one eligible articles (reporting 30 studies conducted in 17 countries) were identified. Meta-analysis of case-control studies using community controls produced VE estimates against Hib meningitis of 55% (95% confidence interval: 2-80%, based on 3 studies), 96% (86-99%, 3 studies) and 96% (86-99%, 4 studies) after 1, 2 and 3 doses of vaccines other than the polyribosyl ribitol phosphate outer membrane protein vaccine. Estimates were similar using hospital controls. VE against invasive Hib disease in case-control studies was estimated as 59% (30-76%, 3 studies) and 97% (87-99%, 3 studies) for 1 and 3 doses (insufficient data were identified to estimate 2-dose VE). Point estimates from 2 studies suggested VE>90% after 1 dose of the polyribosyl ribitol phosphate outer membrane protein vaccine, but meta-analysis was not possible. Using data from 4 cohort studies, 3-dose VE was estimated as 94% (88-97%). There was some evidence that Hib vaccine was less effective when administered with acellular (rather than whole cell) pertussis vaccine. Weak evidence from 2 studies suggested that a booster confers some additional protection following full primary vaccination and may compensate for an incomplete primary series.<br/> CONCLUSIONS: Observational data suggest that ≥2 doses of Hib vaccine are required for high effectiveness, but do not strongly favor any particular schedule.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 23811746
Web of Science ID: 330832500021
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1035398

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
291Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item