Prevention and treatment strategies used for the community management of childhood fever in Kampala, Uganda.


Kemble, SK; Davis, JC; Nalugwa, T; Njama-Meya, D; Hopkins, H; Dorsey, G; Staedke, SG; (2006) Prevention and treatment strategies used for the community management of childhood fever in Kampala, Uganda. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 74 (6). pp. 999-1007. ISSN 0002-9637

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Abstract

: To assess malaria-related prevention and treatment strategies in an urban parish of Kampala, Uganda, a questionnaire was administered to 339 randomly selected primary caregivers of children 1-10 years of age. Our study population was relatively stable and well educated, with better access to health services than many in Africa. Ownership of an insecticide-treated net (ITN) was reported by 11% of households and was predicted only by greater household wealth (highest quartile versus lowest quartile: odds ratio [OR] 21.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.74-173). Among women, 5% reported use of an ITN and 11% used intermittent preventive therapy (IPT) during their last pregnancy. Use of appropriate IPT during pregnancy was predicted only by completion of secondary education or higher (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.13-7.21). Children of 123 (36%) caregivers had experienced an episode of fever in the past 2 weeks. Of these, 22% received an anti-malarial that could be considered "adequate" (combination therapy or quinine). Only 1% of febrile children received adequate treatment at the correct dose within 24 hours of onset of fever. The only independent predictor of treatment with an adequate anti-malarial was accessing a clinic or hospital as the first source of care. In this urban area, use of appropriate malaria control measures occurs uncommonly.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Antimicrobial Resistance Centre (AMR)
Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 16760510
Web of Science ID: 238200900013
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/10211

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